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Ringworm "Death Becomes My Voice" Album Review




Listening to RINGWORM is as satisfying as receiving a double blowjob from a two-headed Siamese twin. Whether they're live or you're banging your head to one of their albums, there's a feeling of sheer pleasure that permeates throughout your flesh.  It could be the blistering guitars of Matt Sorg and Mark Witherspoon, the bass and drum combo of Ed Stephens and Ryan Steigerwald or the hardcorish vocals of HF. But whatever the fuck causes it, you won't leave the experience the same way you came in.


Sharing the same title as the album, first track 'Death Becomes My Voice' begins with weeping guitars and malodorous bass before ejaculating a blitzkrieg of chaotic vocals and pounding drums. There's no subtle dipping into the waters of this thrashcore-infested album. The boys jump right in in all their foul glory. And goddammit if the song doesn't keep picking up speed as it progresses. The gurgling bass and mallet-crunching drums introduce 'Carnivores' as HF (or Human Furnace, whatever the hell you wanna call him) screams like his soul depends on it.




There's a pretty fucked up video of 'Acquiesce' that fits right along with the pretty fucked up song. And next track 'Do Not Resuscitate' continues with the aural lobotomy that RINGWORM have performed so far. The chugging guitars of 'Dead To Me', the moshfest of 'The God Of New Flesh' and neck-breaking sucker-punch of 'I Want To Tear The World Apart' obliterate the senses as 'Separate Realities', 'Let It Burn' and 'Final Division' drain the sweat from your pores. And let's not leave out 'Dying By Design' that's like a stop-motion trainwreck that leaves you mangled in a crumpled heap.


If you're familiar with RINGWORM, then none of this should surprise you. But if you're new to the band, check this shit out immediately. Throw away your nu-metal bullshit and sink your teeth into this blast of metal annihilation. Your life will change.



- Review by David Simonton